Share |
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Asprin and cancer  (Read 2405 times)
mum123
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 258


« on: March 21, 2012, 09:51:20 AM »

hi

just heard on the radio new evidence has come to light regarding Asprin and cancer . DO you have any links where i could find more information

many thanks

stef x
Logged
Angela
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 56


WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2012, 12:11:19 PM »

Hi Stef

There is information about this study in

The Guardian http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2012/mar/20/cancer-drugs
BBC Online http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-17443454

which you may find useful.

Best wishes

Angela
Logged

Angela Cummings - Beating Bowel Cancer Patient Forum Manager
mum123
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 258


« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2012, 06:14:27 PM »

Thanks Angela

regards

stef x
Logged
chools
Volunteer Moderator
Hero Member
****
Posts: 2083



« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2012, 09:58:13 AM »

I've just caught a snatch of further news on this on the radio. It seems that the key component of aspirin is  salicin which is found naturally on all fruit and veg, except those that have been treated with pesticide which kills off this organism. Consuming salicin via fruit and veg is also much less likely to carry any side effects as seen with aspirin (internal bleeding etc)

I've long been a fan of organic fruit and veg, either buying it or growing my own and know that organic food has also held quite a negative press in some quarters. It seems that pesticides in our food has killed off a natural anti cancer agent which is a great shame. I wonder how many other industrialised processes increase our cancer risk?
Logged

The general population doesn't know what's happening, and it doesn't even know that it doesn't know. -Noam Chomsky
mum123
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 258


« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2012, 06:17:38 PM »

HI Chools that interesting , i also try to eat organic
take care

stef x
Logged
alisonhelen
Volunteer Moderator
Hero Member
****
Posts: 1516


It's good to be alive!


« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2012, 11:17:15 PM »

Yes, very interesting Chools, I really must make more of an effort to buy organic, I live near the country and have farm shops all around, so it shouldn't be difficult! Also I have to take Aspirin as I have Atril Fibrilation, but I'm always coming out in unexplained bruising which will only get worse when I start my chemo soon Sad

Food for thought indeed, thank you!

Alison
Logged

Come with me on a journey, no map, destination unknown and I'll travel your path with you. We'll hold each other up when the road gets steep, we'll laugh and cry along the way, because I feel your pain and you feel mine.
Feel free to read my blog:-'Why not me?' http://alisonhelen.blogspot.co.uk/
ailsajr
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 346



« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2012, 04:11:06 PM »

For anyone who's interested, I found an article about how it is thought aspirin works as an inhibitor of cancer, including colorectal cancer. It's an open access journal  Grin, so you can read the whole article here http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8247/5/12/1346/pdf.

Best wishes,

Ailsa
Logged

Do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.
Shirley
Guest
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2012, 08:51:14 AM »

Thanks very much for the link, Ailsa!  I'm also on low dose daily aspirin due to suspected post-chemo heart problems, but it's interesting that colorectal cancers and atherothrombosis might share a common disease mechanism involving excessive platelet activation.  Platelet research is part of my job and so I knew there was growing evidence that platelets were linked to metastatic spread in some instances.
I have also noticed a good deal of unexplained bruising since finishing chemo and starting the low dose aspirin regime - but I have been assured that it could not possibly be linked to aspirin. Maybe it isn't ...but maybe it is...and I'll mention it to them again and also take them up on the offer of a coag screen.  Thanks again.
Shirley
Logged
ailsajr
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 346



« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2012, 07:23:23 PM »

Hi Shirley,
Yes, I thought that was very interesting too. Discovering similarities in mechanisms and modes of activity is quite often a very productive area in science, as it can get us thinking about things in a way that's a bit "outside the box" of our normal scientific disciplines.

Best wishes,

Ailsa
Logged

Do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.
chools
Volunteer Moderator
Hero Member
****
Posts: 2083



« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2012, 07:32:20 PM »

Interesting the possible link between the diseases Shirley, I had three stents fitted earlier this year due to blocked arteries. I'm now on low dose aspirin for life now so hopefully it might ward off further cancer

Chools
Logged

The general population doesn't know what's happening, and it doesn't even know that it doesn't know. -Noam Chomsky
HeatherL
Volunteer Moderator
Hero Member
****
Posts: 1960


« Reply #10 on: December 13, 2012, 08:29:19 PM »

Interesting the possible link between the diseases Shirley, I had three stents fitted earlier this year due to blocked arteries. I'm now on low dose aspirin for life now so hopefully it might ward off further cancer

Chools

Do you take the asprin with food/milk to help with the risk of bleeding Chools. I have been reading about asprin this last few days and wonder whether to start to take it myself.
Logged
chools
Volunteer Moderator
Hero Member
****
Posts: 2083



« Reply #11 on: December 13, 2012, 08:49:37 PM »

I take the drug omeprazle to help suppress the bleeding Heather. I also take a blood thinner and a few weeks after my stent op I noticed the dreaded blood in the stools and immediately thought of the return of cancer, but it turned out to be the aspirin/blood thinner (Clopidogrel) causing the bleeding

I've not heard of any natural food or drink which protects to from aspirin, maybe milk does 'line' your stomach but not sure?

From what I've read about aspirin in terms of pros and cons it seems that if you're over 50 it's worth taking a low dose

Chools
Logged

The general population doesn't know what's happening, and it doesn't even know that it doesn't know. -Noam Chomsky
ailsajr
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 346



« Reply #12 on: December 13, 2012, 09:42:20 PM »

You can get 75mg enteric coated aspirins (I get them from Morrisons, where they have a yellow packet, but there are several brands available). Even a daily dose as low as 75mg appears to be of benefit, and the enteric coat should help to reduce bleeding and stomach problems, although some have reported that the enteric coating makes it less potent than plain aspirin, and of course, it makes it act more slowly, so it's not great for headaches Sad. See, for example http://www.wellnessletter.com/ucberkeley/feature/should-your-aspirin-wear-a-coat/#, http://www.news-medical.net/news/2004/05/19/1697.aspx for some discussion of pros and cons (these articles are mainly about using aspirin for cardiovascular reasons).

Recent studies suggest that even low dose aspirin can have an influence in reducing the likelihood of metastases, as Shirley mentions (see for example http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22440947, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22440112).

Best wishes,
Ailsa

Logged

Do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own.
chools
Volunteer Moderator
Hero Member
****
Posts: 2083



« Reply #13 on: December 13, 2012, 09:50:13 PM »

The coated aspirins sound good Ailsa, thanks for that. 75mg is the dose I take

Chools

PS just found this http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2010/02/25/confusion-over-whether-coated-aspirin-can-protect-your-stomach/

gets complicated  Undecided
« Last Edit: December 13, 2012, 09:54:45 PM by chools » Logged

The general population doesn't know what's happening, and it doesn't even know that it doesn't know. -Noam Chomsky
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to: