Share |
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: Rate of growth  (Read 4246 times)
Richard
Newbie
*
Posts: 21


« on: June 02, 2011, 12:08:24 PM »

A 68 year old male relative of mine has recently had endoscopy after a positive result from a screening test (his first one)
The endoscopy resulted in the removal of 5 polyps but one 40mm one was too large to deal with. The biopsy from which came back a cancerous, the next step is a CT scan to try and stage the cancer. He had a ct scan 18 months ago for a stomach ulcer, this scan has now been reviewed and shows no signs of other organ tumours, my question is 18 months enough time to get to stage 4 from a previously clear CT scan. In other words how fast does cancer actually spread.
Thankyou
Logged
Holly
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307


Nurse Advisor


« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2011, 01:43:24 PM »

Hello Richard.
Thank you for getting in touch with us here at Beating Bowel Cancer.
From what I can understand from your email, the polyp that has been biopsied, and is cancerous, was simply too large to be removed during the colonoscopy.
This does not necessarily mean it is a stage 4 bowel cancer. Small polyps can and are often removed during the colonoscopy procedure itself, but anything larger and suspected of being a cancerous growth, would need to be removed in surgery. This is done to ensure all of the polyp and a good 'margin' (around the polyp) is removed.
Stage 4 bowel cancers are cancers that have spread outside of the bowel and affected other organs - for example the liver or lungs.
You can read more about the stages following this link.
http://www.beatingbowelcancer.org/sites/default/files/page_files/TreatmentYourPathwayV4.0.pdf
(page 7 on the PDF)
Bowel cancer is usually described as a 'slow growing' cancer, and perhaps if these polyps had been relatively small 18 months ago, they would not have shown up on the CT. The polyp in question could have progressed a bit faster than the others (during the 18 months) and unfortunately become cancerous.
I hope this is helpful Richard.

Please don't hesitate to contact us again in future, for anything at all.
Also if we can support your friend in anyway, please do let us know.
Many kind regards,
Holly - Nurse Advisor




Logged


Holly Rolfe
Nurse Advisor
Richard
Newbie
*
Posts: 21


« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2011, 02:08:13 PM »

Thank you for the swift reply, one more question when the CT scan is done will the results be analysed and discussed there and then or is it another worrying wait for the results.
Logged
Holly
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307


Nurse Advisor


« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2011, 02:53:54 PM »

Hello again Richard.
The results of the CT may well be discussed after the scan, if perhaps the consultant is present, but normally it can take a few days or a week or so for the results to be reviewed. These results may then need to be discussed with the multidisciplinary team (other health professionals) depending on the result, and sometimes this can take a little longer I'm afraid.
It can be a worrying time I know but its best if the results are reveiwed fully by all members of the team, in this case.
Kind regards,
Holly - Nurse Advisor
Logged


Holly Rolfe
Nurse Advisor
amanda86
Newbie
*
Posts: 23


« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2011, 07:30:46 PM »

Easier said that done I know, but try not to worry. My Mum had (what we didn't know were) signs of bowel cancer for about 9 months before it was diagnosed - meaning it's slow growing even though the surgeon described it as 'a nasty customer'.
I'm sure everything will be fine and here if you need a chat.
Amanda
Logged
Richard
Newbie
*
Posts: 21


« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2011, 10:43:52 AM »

Thank's for that, another concern is we have a holiday abroad booked in 8 weeks time, they are planning on an operation within 6 weeks, He has no idea what it could involve. Does he delay the op and have the holiday? or if the area to be cut out of the bowel is small will recovery be fairly rapid. Until the scan is done we have no idea how deep into the bowel wall this 40mm polyp has grown, I personally wouldn't delay the op by one day but it may be his last chance of a holiday feeling 100% for a while.   Huh
« Last Edit: June 03, 2011, 10:46:27 AM by Richard » Logged
Holly
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307


Nurse Advisor


« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2011, 12:13:47 PM »

Hello again Richard.
That is a tough one......
It really would be very difficult to advise what best to do in this situation - has your relative spoken to his clinicians about the holiday?
The team may want to get on and do the operation as quickly as possible, of course it is up to your relative if he wants to delay it or not, the problem is, it is very difficult to assume how well he may be after his operation. Depending on what sort of operation he is going to have, be it an open resection or laparascopic (keyhole) may depend as you say on scan results. Even then, with all the intention of carrying the surgery out by the keyhole method sometimes it can change during the procedure itself, therefore becoming an open resection. An open resection means a incision is made down the middle of the abdomen, therefore going through layers of stomach muscle. In this case patients are advised not to drive or do any heavy lifting for at least 6 weeks, and because of this I doubt very much if he may feel up to travelling abroad.
The other problem is that sometimes people can find their bowel habit is disturbed following surgery, and in some cases this can take a time for people to get used to.
As I mentioned, I think it best for your relative to have an honest conversation with his consultant as to what he can expect following surgery.
Keep in touch.

Holly - Nurse Advisor
Logged


Holly Rolfe
Nurse Advisor
Richard
Newbie
*
Posts: 21


« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2011, 01:44:55 PM »

I hope the consultant explains to him what implications this op has, he honestly believes its going to be a quick in and out two day procedure, because he had four to five polyps removed by cold snare he thinks its just a big one of those. I'm not going to tell him anything about what could happen I will leave that to the experts. Is it possible for a 40mm polyp to be removed from the wall of the bowel with little damage.
Logged
Holly
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307


Nurse Advisor


« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2011, 02:57:32 PM »

You could always provide some information to your relative, Richard, if you feel it appropriate to do so.
Our publications 'your pathway' and 'your operation' (which I have included below) have some easy to read information, which your relative may really feel the benefit of reading.
http://www.beatingbowelcancer.org/sites/default/files/page_files/SurgeryYourOperationBookletV4.0.pdf
http://www.beatingbowelcancer.org/sites/default/files/page_files/TreatmentYourPathwayV4.0.pdf
He can always just print it off from home.
Perhaps his consultant has already discussed what he/she hopes to achieve during surgery, in which case he could be home within 3 days, if he responds well, and it was done using the keyhole method.
It really is very difficult to be sure though, as everyone is different, and everyones rate of recovery is so very different. Of course there are implications to any type of surgery, major or minor, so it would be useful for your relative to know exactly what he might expect.
You could always offer to go along with him, to meet his consultant and even ask questions yourself, if he is happy for you to do this.
Try not to worry Richard, the surgeons will try to ensure the removal of the polyp itself and any surrounding 'healthy tissue' margin, to aim to ensure no cancer cells are left behind. They will also remove any lymph nodes from the surrounding area, especially if they seem to have any involvement in the tumour itself.
Holly
Logged


Holly Rolfe
Nurse Advisor
Holly
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307


Nurse Advisor


« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2011, 03:09:02 PM »

Richard, I also think this factsheet may be useful to you.
It has some good advice on what to expect after the operation.
http://www.beatingbowelcancer.org/sites/default/files/page_files/ReturningHomeAfterSurgeryV2.0.pdf

Many kind regards,
Holly
  Smiley
Logged


Holly Rolfe
Nurse Advisor
Richard
Newbie
*
Posts: 21


« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2011, 02:45:24 PM »

Ohhhh one more thing I meant to ask, sorry to be a pain, in your experience is a this 40mm growth large in terms of the average tumour size and does it in any way indicate the age of this tumour.
Logged
Holly
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307


Nurse Advisor


« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2011, 03:18:43 PM »

Hello again Richard.
It would be helpful to know what type of polyp it is as there are a couple of different types.
The two main shapes are described as 'pedunculated' and 'sessile'. This first type are often mushroom shaped and look like they have grown on a stalk. These are fairly easy to remove and the risk of cancer spread from these types of polyp is lower than with the 'sessile' type. This is mainly due to them being a little more isolated from the main bowel wall.
The 'sessile' polyps are often growing directly on/in the bowel wall itself and are often faster growing, so can be seen as higher risk. They are also often more difficult to remove.
So depending on the type it might be easier to esimate the age of the growth, but it would be useful to discuss this with your relatives consultant, as he/she will know this individual case best.
Holly - Nurse Advisor.

Logged


Holly Rolfe
Nurse Advisor
Richard
Newbie
*
Posts: 21


« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2011, 08:48:40 AM »

Got the CT scan results no sign of secondary tumours, he is going in for an op to do a resection very soon, before that though they have spotted something wrong with his bladder that they want to investigate ASAP could this be related to the bowel cancer?

On average how long is it from a CT result to performing the actual resection operation, is there a NHS guidline to meet.

Thank you
Logged
Holly
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 307


Nurse Advisor


« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2011, 10:20:29 AM »

Hello Richard.
I'm glad to hear the CT results are back and your relative will be having a resection soon.
I understand how frustrating it can be waiting to start treatment.
I have included a link on waiting times, which has further links for you to follow if you should wish to know more.
Once the scan results are back, it shouldn't be too long until a date is set for surgery, but you must bear in mind that sometimes the rest of the multidisciplinary team will need to be involved, so this could influence the wait.

http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/about-cancer/cancer-questions/waiting-times-for-tests-and-treatment-after-cancer-diagnosis#treat

The problem in the bladder could be caused by any number of things so it would be very difficult for me to say if the two are related. If you could give me a little more detail I may be able to help further, but the fact that the team want to investigate this problem further, and soon as you say, is reassuring.

I hope this is helpful Richard.
Many kind regards,
Holly
« Last Edit: June 16, 2011, 10:26:57 AM by Holly » Logged


Holly Rolfe
Nurse Advisor
Richard
Newbie
*
Posts: 21


« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2011, 10:47:38 AM »

One more thing the team say he may or may not have to have a colostomy bag, why is it sometimes necessary to divert the bowel and on a temporary basis, yet sometimes it can be joined during the resection?
Logged
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to: