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Author Topic: Leaking bag?  (Read 1492 times)
Valann
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« on: August 09, 2013, 08:25:07 PM »

Hi this is my first post, although we have been reading this excellent forum for a while. My husband was diagnosed with rectal cancer in January. He had chemo and 25 radiotherapy session, then surgery 2 weeks ago. The biopsie was AT2NO which we think is really good news. The problem he has, which is really getting him down is leaking bags. For the last  3 days every bag has leaked. The problem seems to be an area of skin under the stoma (temporary illeo) which is raw and weeping. The stoma nurse brings different bags and seals, and because he is changing bags 3 or 4 times a day it is just getting worse. Has anyone had this experience? Any advice would be very much appreciated.
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HeatherL
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« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2013, 09:29:24 PM »

Hello Valaan and welcome. I cannot advise or give input as didn't have a stoma. But I know many members did and will be able discuss with you. Just wanted to say hello  Smiley
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suze
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2013, 09:43:05 PM »

My best advice would be to pop over to the ileostomy association forum, there are far more ppl with relevant existence experience there

There are products you can spray on to encourage adhesion on damp skin, and he needs to be sure his holes on the base plate /flange  are cut to the right size.  Personally I found that easier to judge with a two piece system, but I get the impression stoma nurses tend to offer one piece systems at first.

Leaking bags is depressing, but rarely a long lived problem, to some extent just accepting that it is vile, but that it will improve can help.  

What do you mean by changing bags Several times a day?  Because of the leaks? If not for that, but because they are fill, then he wants to try and leave a base plate / flange on his skin for as long as possible, either by using a two piece system or at the very least a bag with a fixture on the bottom to allow for emptying so that the flange stays put and thus maximises the chance for the skin to dry out and heal.

With my two piece I could go for a few days with the same flange.

All the best
Suze
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Sept 2006 Dx. Chemo-rad. to down-size. Jan '07, surgery and ileostomy. March '07-Oct07, 12 cycles of chemo. Jun 08, Ileo reversed.  Oct 09, fresh mets: bowel and lungs. 2nd bowel op. Dec 09-May10, more chemo. 18 months off! Dec 2011, lung mets grew - Jan 2012, lung surgery.
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Valann
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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2013, 10:08:34 PM »

Thank you Heather and Suzie
He is changing bags because of the leaks, the bag is just not sealing because, we think, the weeping wound. I've been reading elsewhere about colivan spray? His skin round the stoma is getting really sore.
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chools
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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2013, 10:25:17 PM »

Hi Valann,

You can get into a vicious circle with leaks, they can make the skin sore which in turn means the flange of the bag doesn't stick so well and leaks

There are various sprays that help seal the sore skin so the flange sticks better to the skin

If you google 'ostomy supplies' or 'ileostomy supplies' you should see lists of manufacturers come up together with their products. Most of them offer free samples

However, at this relatively early stage I would have hoped that your stoma nurse might have offered something to help his sore skin

I like Suze was also a fan of the two part bag as it meant changing the flange less, and also you can get larger bags for use during the night which I found useful

The web address for the IA support group that Suze mentioned is : http://www.iasupport.org

Chools
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Illness is neither an indulgence for which people have to pay, nor an offence for which they should be penalised, but a misfortune, the cost of which should be shared by the community
Dan-88
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« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2013, 11:46:31 PM »

I did not have a weeping wound. The stoma is soft and well supplied by blood vessels so will easily bleed a bit if scratched.
As mentioned, its very important to get the size of the hole cut as accurately as possible to fit round the stoma without catching it.
For me, I developed sore patches very quickly which my v experienced Stoma nurse recognised immediately as a common skin reaction to the adhesive used for the stoma bag.
She had a tube of barrier cream which she immediately gave me to use
 ~ right from the 1st meeting I had with her, she was absolutely insistent that I and I alone, learnt how to change my bags, clean myself up, etc. Totally no nonsense approach which scared me into being an excellent student!!
It worked very well but it did mean I had to learn to spend more time and care when I changed my bag (every other day usually). I had to make sure the cream was well and truly rubbed into my skin before I attempted to stick on the new bag.
Of course, that meant I had to position my stoma over the loo should it become active as it often did!

What I found to be really critical was lying back so that my belly was as flat as possible immediately after a new bag has been stuck on, rubbing the flange with warmth from the palms of my hands. This seems to make the flange really stick on properly and be a lot less susceptible to creasing which starts a weak spot and the cause of the few leaks I'd suffered.
Which reminds me that if one slouches or remain bent forward, that does tend to crease the bag's flange introducing weak-lines, the common cause of leaks.

Before I sussed this, I was naturally v upset when I had a leak. The suppliers of my stoma products suggested trying some semi-circular sticky flanges ~ I think they were called 'hydro frames' or something like that.
These were extra sticky pieces which you use to stick around the flange of your bag which made very sure there were no leaks! They even come with different degrees of stickiness!
Later on, I used them when I went swimming and they took all of that with absolutely no problems, no part of the flanges coming undone in any way what so ever. Even those with the lowest amount of 'tack'.
I continued to use my one-piece bag for 90+% of the time without any extra flanges, for the whole year I had a stoma.

Hope some of that has helped? Your Stoma nurse is a specialist and will be a great help ~ work closely with him/her.
Do write back with any concerns, queries ~ anything, even if you might think its a bit sensitive ~ loads of us have already suffered all the embarrassments going so really won't blink an eye!! Cheesy

<EDIT: p/s my bags can be emptied from the bottom which is secured simply by folds and velco strips. You shouldn't really have them more than 1/3 full if you can help it as I recall that if they are full that puts extra strain on when you bend, which we all do. I did all the emptying and changing myself ~ not sure if it is practical for someone else to try to do it for you. >
« Last Edit: August 10, 2013, 09:18:04 AM by Dan-88 » Logged

Oct'11 diagnosed colorectal (T3N1M0), Nov'11-Jan'12 daily Radio+Chemo, Apr'12 surgery & ileostomy, Jun-Dec'12 fortnightly FolFox6 Chemo, Jan'13 First 'All Clear' CT scan, Mar'13 Ileo reversal, May'13 3-mthly check changed to 6-mthly, Jul'13 Colonoscopy clear, Sep'13 Bloods clear. Mar'14 CT All Clear
Pollycooper1972
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« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2013, 03:35:22 PM »

Hi valaan I experienced the same and found using a talc that the stoma nurses gave me and changing my bags to the Dansac ones that I wore a belt with really helped. I got more sore with my output being watery so I was advised to eat bananas and jelly babies xx
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Hazel
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« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2013, 04:25:57 PM »

I have been lucky and my bags seem to have settled and don't cause me a problem. Whilst I was in hospital though the woman opposite was having terrible trouble with leaking they in the end got her a vacuum pump machine which seemed to start to ease things,she had terrible soreness. It might not be the right option for you but it is something that you may be able to discuss with your Stoma nurse. Calamine lotion is helpful too as long as you make sure it dries completely then the bag should still adhere to the surface. I do hope that you resolve this soon.
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